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Auto Insurance for your teen driver

Teen Drivers & Auto Insurance

Tips to Keep Auto Insurance Costs Down

Being the parent of a teenager that is getting ready to climb behind the steering and venture out on the road is uncharted territory for many. Insuring your new driver can be an expensive endeavor and even overwhelming to think about. We are here to help! The risk of motor vehicle crashes is higher among 16-19 year-olds than any other driving age group. Here are some helpful tips we have gathered to assist you in keeping your premiums as low as possible and to help keep your new teen driver safe and accident-free.

Add Your Teen to Your Auto Policy

Rather than setting up an independent policy for your teen driver, consider adding him or her as an additional driver on your auto insurance policy. Also, if you have more than one vehicle, keep costs down by designating which vehicle your child will be driving.

Deductible Considerations

Auto deductibles typically range from $250 to $1,000. By upping your deductible and using your insurance for big repairs, you can significantly reduce your premium.

Ask for the Student Discount

If your teenager maintains at least a 3.0 grade point average (GPA), he or she typically qualifies for a rate discount.

Weigh Your Buying Decision

Wanting to get your teenager a new car to drive with the latest safety equipment is understandable, but you may be better off purchasing a safe, used vehicle in terms of premium prices.

We’re Here to Help   

Contact our office by phone at 866.374.5084 or CLICK HERE to learn more about all of our automobile insurance and personal risk management solutions.

Top Ways to Save on Your Auto Premium:

  • Consider increasing your Comprehensive and/or Collision Deductible(s)
  • Inquire about a good student discount
  • Have your teen keep up their safe driving record
  • Confirm if there are any multi-policy discounts available to you.

Are you interested in a Parent/Teen Driving Agreement? A driving contract or agreement with your teen can help reinforce that driving is a privilege that should be taken seriously, may help eliminate any confusion about you and your families’ rules when it comes to driving, and provide pre-established consequences to utilize in the event the driving rules are broken. If interested, we have a Parent/Teen Driving Contract available for you to use at your own discretion. Download your copy today. 

Parent/Teen Driving Agreement

 

 

Set Your Expectations for Safety and Minimize Distracted Driving

Teens can get distracted easily. To help reduce potential accidents:

  • Restrict your teen’s nighttime driving
  • Do not allow them to drive with more than one other person in the car
  • Ban cell phone use while driving
  • Lead by example with your own driving habits
  • Ride with your son or daughter occasionally to make sure they are keeping up with the safety habits that they learned in driver’s education

Consider these best practices before your teen starts driving:

  1. As soon as your teen is ready to get his/her learner’s permit, contact Acentria.
  2. If your child gets into an accident, we will generally cover it but may charge a higher premium retroactively if you did not notify them that your child was driving. In rare cases, your coverage may be revoked.
  3. Do not lower your liability coverage drastically to combat rate increases. It simply does not make sense to carry less liability for higher-risk teen drivers. You will be forced to cover damages out-of-pocket if your child gets into an accident without enough coverage if you do not carry adequate car insurance coverage.
                                                                          

You have heard various statistics over the years and may have even experienced them yourself. Did you know that – According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Teenage drivers are most likely to have an accident during their first year of driving. Teens give in to peer pressure from passengers easily and are more likely to speed or race other vehicles while in the presence of their peers. The National Institute of Mental Health claims that the part of the brain that weighs risks, makes judgment decisions and controls impulses are not fully developed until the age of 25.


To think of the risks teen drivers face can be daunting. No matter what is to come on the road ahead, we encourage you to review your current auto insurance policy with a licensed insurance agent, consider additional liability coverage under a personal umbrella policy and continue the conversation with your teen driver regularly.

Quote My Auto Insurance

Request a personalized auto insurance quote from Acentria Insurance
or a policy review by clicking the link above. 

 
Disclaimer: For information purposes only. The information provided herein is not intended to be exhaustive, nor should it be construed as advice regarding coverage. Eligibility for coverage is not guaranteed and limited to the terms and conditions contained in the applicable policy. © 2008, 2010, 2016 Zywave Inc. 

 

            
            
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Named Storm Deductibles | How do these deductibles work?

The heavy rainfall, high winds and storm surges associated with hurricanes and other intense storms can devastate any home or business property, even those located hundreds of miles off of a coast. With the potential to cause tens of billions of dollars in damage, insurance companies and carriers generally use special, “named storm deductibles,” to provide coverage in the event of a loss.


Named storm deductibles are typically higher than traditional fixed-dollar deductibles for losses related to fire, theft and even water in some cases. Named storm deductibles are only triggered under specific circumstances and can vary based on location. However, it is important to know the details of these deductibles so your family, your home and even your business are prepared in the event of a severe storm.

What’s in a Name?

Named storm deductibles are triggered by just that—a tropical depression, tropical storm or hurricane that is severe enough to be named by the National Weather Service (NWS).

The NWS first started to name storms to make it easier for the public to track and follow severe storms as they developed. However, after large hurricanes and tropical storms began to cause large amounts of damage, insurance providers began looking for ways to mitigate their losses. Named storm deductibles, tied to the time periods surrounding the National Weather Service-named storms, help insurance providers mitigate losses caused by a named storm.

It is important to note that other organizations have started to name storms. The Weather Channel, a privately owned weather organization, recently began naming winter storms in order to make tracking them easier for its viewers. However, insurance providers only apply named storm deductibles to storms named by the NWS.

The Triggers for Named Storm Deductibles

The triggers for named storm deductibles can vary based on the insurance provider and location, although almost all triggers generally include a timing window, such as 24 hours before a storm is named by the NWS to 48 hours after it is downgraded to a tropical storm. During this window, your named storm deductible will apply to any damage instead of the normal wind and hail deductible.

Other triggers can include when a hurricane makes landfall or when a hurricane watch is declared. Because the triggers for named storm deductibles can vary significantly, it’s important to look up the exact rules as defined by the state you live in and your specific insurance policy.

Price Differences

Named storm deductibles are generally higher than regular deductibles because they are based on a percentage rather than on a fixed dollar amount. Most named storm deductibles are between 1%-5% of your total insured amount, but in high-risk areas, deductibles can reach as high as 10%.

For example, imagine that the Dwelling Coverage A on your home insurance policy is insured for $500,000. If your home is damaged by normal wind or hail loss, you would pay a regular, fixed-dollar deductible—usually $500 or $1,000—before your insurance provider would provide coverage for the remaining damage. However, if the damage was caused during the window of a named storm deductible, your deductible would be calculated using a percentage. For a 5% deductible, this would amount to an out-of-pocket expense of $25,000 before your insurance provider would pay for damages.

What it Means for You

Deductibles for damage caused by named storms are higher in order to mitigate the financial risk to insurance providers while still offering premiums that are relatively low. Additionally, many insurance providers believe that the high deductibles will encourage homeowners and other property owners to take proactive steps to protect their homes from severe storms.

 

For more information on named storm deductibles, tips to protect your home from severe storms or a review of your current home or property insurance policy, contact us today. 

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Life Events that Affect Your Insurance Needs

Life Events that Affect Your Insurance Needs 

As we age and reach different milestones in our lives, our insurance needs change. In order to ensure adequate coverage, contact a licensed insurance agent at Acentria Insurance if you’re affected by any of the following life events:

  • New homeownership— Purchasing a new home is a big investment—one that you will want to protect. After purchasing a home, ensure that you have homeowners insurance to protect against things like fire, weather damage, theft, vandalism and accidental damage. This advice also holds true if you are buying a new condo or vacation home.
  • Home renovations—Once you own a home, you may want to make updates to create a better living space. Be sure to report major home improvements to your insurance company to protect any increased value to your home.
  • New children—Having or adopting children is not only a huge life change, but it’s also a major financial commitment. As such, it’s important to purchase the right policy to secure your child’s future. Add your child as a beneficiary on any life insurance policies, and make sure your coverage is sufficient.
  • Teenage drivers— Teen drivers often carry the highest risk of auto accidents. While you want your teen driver to remain safe on the road, costly accidents can happen without warning. Consider adding your teen driver to your auto policy, as it is generally cheaper than purchasing a separate policy.
  • Retirement—When you retire, you may change residences. If you have more than one home, this is a good time to let your insurance provider know where you plan to spend your time.
  • Valuable purchases—A standard homeowners policy has limited coverage for highly valuable items. Supplement purchases and gifts that exceed the policy’s limits with a floater—a separate policy that provides additional insurance.
  • Marriage—When your marital status changes, so do your insurance needs. Marriage typically leads to the combination of households, vehicles and other property, so it is critical to update your insurance policies accordingly. What’s more, life insurance is vital to married couples as it can ease the financial burden in the event of an untimely death of a partner. Ask about discounts on car insurance for married policyholders.
  • Purchasing or selling a business—If you’re an entrepreneur, there will likely come a time when you will either buy or sell your business. During these times of major change, the proper coverage is crucial.

Insurance is critical for nearly every stage of life. Seeking coverage should be an active process, and individuals shouldn’t assume their insurance needs remain steady over time. Contact us today to better understand your insurance and prepare for your future needs.

*Know Your Insurance is offered courtesy of Acentria Insurance and Zywave, Inc. The above statements should not be construed as legal advice. Readers should contact legal counsel or speak with a licensed insurance professional for appropriate advice.

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Acentria named Top 100 Independent Agency in United States

Acentria Insurance named Top 100 Independent Agency in the United States

Insurance Journal recently named Acentria Insurance a Top 100 Independent Agency. Ranking 35th of 100, this marks the first time Acentria has been named to the prestigious list, which is designed to spotlight the nation’s most successful independent insurance agencies. Acentria was one of 11 newcomers to the Top 100 Independent Property & Casualty Agency List by Insurance Journal this year.

Here’s how the process works: every year, Insurance Journal selects the top organizations from a large pool of property/casualty independent agencies around the United States with primary business in business in retail, not wholesale. These agencies are evaluated and subsequently chosen based upon their property/casualty revenue (Acentria totaled $73,807,728 in property/casualty revenue for 2020). 

“Being recognized as one of the top independent insurance agencies in the United States is a major accomplishment for our organization,” said Kevin Mason, Chief Executive Officer and co-founder of Acentria Insurance. “To have maintained and continued our level of growth during unprecedented times, especially around a global pandemic is a true testament to our company values as well as our valued team members. As a Foundation Risk Partners, our clients will always remain our top guiding principal as we continue our upward growth.”

Headquartered in Destin, Florida, Acentria was the only North Florida agency selected to the list. The recognition comes months after five Acentria agents were named to the 2021 Top Producers by Insurance Business America.

 We’re proud of our team’s success in 2020 and look forward to continual growth in 2021!

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Medicare 101: Everything you need to know to get started

You hear the term all the time, and clearly, it’s health-related, but what exactly is Medicare, and who is it for? If you qualify, do you also need a Medicare supplemental plan? If you’re looking for these answers, you have come to the right place. We’ll start with the basics and work our way up. 

First of all, what is Medicare? Who qualifies? 

Medicare is health insurance. It’s for people who are: 

  • age 65 or older 
  • under 65 with certain disabilities 
  • any age with end-stage renal disease (otherwise known as permanent kidney failure) 

Exploring the ABCs (and D) of Medicare 

Here’s where things get a little trickier. There’s more than one type of Medicare. In fact, there are four, and they cover different forms of care you might be receiving. Then, you might also consider adding a supplemental plan to close any gaps in your coverage. Plus, each option has a different cost structure attached to it. Let’s review. 

Part A covers the inpatient care you receive in hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, and hospice and home health care.  

What does Part A cost you? If you qualify (see above) and paid Medicare taxes while working, there’s usually no monthly premium. 

Part B covers services not included by Part A. Think doctor’s visits, outpatient care and other medically necessary services. 

What does Part B cost you? It depends on your income. Once you enroll, you pay a monthly, income-based premium as well as an annual deductible.  

Mind the gapMany opt for a supplemental insurance policy, like a Medigap plan, to cover any gaps in coverage across Parts A and B. Supplemental insurance helps you pay any remaining health care costs associated with things like copayments, coinsurance and deductibles. 

Part C can also be referred to as Medicare Advantage Plans. These are combination plans managed by private insurance companies that have been approved by Medicare. Usually, the plans include Part A, Part B and (sometimes) Part D coverage. Whatever the combination, the plan must cover medically necessary services. 

What does Part C cost you? Again, it depends. Private insurance companies assign the copays, deductibles and coinsurance attached to these plans at their own discretion.  

Part D covers prescription drugs, and it’s available to everyone who uses Medicare. 

What does Part D cost you? Like with Part C, Part D plans are provided by private companies approved by Medicare, so you pay a monthly premium. 

One more note about payment: If you have Medicare along with another type of insurance, the question of who should pay, or who should pay first, can get complicated. For example, generally, a group health plan would pay before Medicare, but there are also many exceptions. If you have a current Medicare plan in place that is not administered by Acentria, please visit www.Medicare.gov or call 855.798.2627 to speak to someone about the specifics of your situation. If you are interested in reviewing your plan options or have already purchased a plan with Acentria, please contact us directly for more information.

How do I get Medicare?  

Now that we know the different parts, how do you actually get up and running? Let’s review the key steps and information you need. 

Step 1: Fill out the questionnaire 

You should receive this from Medicare about three months before you’re entitled to start coverage. Medicare uses your responses, like whether you have group health insurance through an employer or family member, to set up your file and make sure claims get paid in the right way. 

Step 2: Communicate any updates post-questionnaire 

Let’s say something about your health insurance or coverage changes after you submit the questionnaire. All you have to do is call the Medicare Coordination of Benefits Contractor at 855.798.2627 and they will update your file. 

Step 3: Schedule a free visit 

Once you’ve started on Medicare, be sure to take advantage of a free preventive visit during the first 12 months of your coverage. The visit will allow you to assess your current health status and set up a roadmap for the future.  

Step 4: Create an account  

To access your information and track claims, head over to Medicare.gov and create an account. This is where you can also complete an Authorization Form that allows your family and friends to call Medicare on your behalf. 

We’re here for you.  

Got more questions? If you or a loved one is nearing retirement age, we’re here to help you with everything you need to know. Don’t hesitate to reach out and discuss your options today!

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Home Insurance | Replacement Cost vs. Actual Cash Value

Your homeowner insurance policy can offer financial protection in the event of an unexpected disaster involving your home or personal property. But how you will be reimbursed following a claim depends on the type of coverage you have. There are two main valuation methods when it comes to homeowners insurance—replacement cost coverage (RC) and actual cash value coverage (ACV). By understanding the difference between these valuation methods, you can make informed decisions about your homeowner insurance policy(s) and secure coverage that meets your needs.

Key Differences Between Replacement Cost and Actual Cash Value
Although replacement cost coverage and actual cash value coverage can both offer financial protection in the event of a claim, the amount that your policy will pay out differs between these two valuation methods.

Here are the key differences:
  • Replacement cost coverage can offer compensation for the cost of replacing your stolen, damaged, or destroyed property with a brand-new version (as long as it’s similar in kind and quality to the original). For example, if your couch is destroyed in a house fire, replacement cost coverage would reimburse you for the cost of purchasing a comparable new couch. In other words, replacement cost coverage will replace your property without any deduction for depreciation.
    • This form of coverage can be especially beneficial in protecting against major losses, such as significant damage to the physical structure of your home or expensive items within your home. However, keep in mind that replacement cost coverage typically requires you to pay a higher premium. In addition, remember that you will only be compensated up to your policy limit amount—if you experience a covered loss that exceeds your policy limit, you may have to cover the difference. If you are concerned about the risk of a covered loss totaling more than your policy limit, be sure to consult your trusted broker to discuss additional policy options—such as guaranteed replacement cost coverage or extended replacement cost coverage—which can provide further financial protection.
  • Actual cash value coverage, on the other hand, can offer compensation for the depreciated value of your stolen, damaged or destroyed property. This value is determined by the age, condition and expected remaining useful life of your property. Under this coverage, you wouldn’t be reimbursed for the full cost of replacing your destroyed couch from the above example. Rather, you would be compensated for the current market value of the couch, based on the condition it was in before the fire. That being said, even if you initially purchased the couch several years ago for $2,000, you might only be reimbursed $1,000 for your loss due to depreciation.
    • Although this form of coverage typically offers reduced compensation in the event of a covered claim, you will likely save money on your policy premium. Actual cash value coverage can be more suitable for individuals that live in low-risk areas (e.g., locations, where incidents such as heavy winds, fires or theft are less common,) or own fewer expensive items.

 

Which Coverage Is Best for You?

There are pros and cons to both replacement cost coverage and actual cash value coverage. In order to select the best coverage that meets your specific home insurance policy needs, follow these steps:

  • Determine what you can afford by assessing the impact of both coverages on your financial stability. It’s important to consider the difference in premium costs and claim compensation amounts between each form of coverage.
  • Create a home inventory checklist (be sure to include photos) of all of your belongings and their original value, as well as an estimate of their current value. This practice will help you better determine which coverage offers the best protection for your unique belongings. Keep in mind that certain high-value items—such as jewelry, collectible items or fine art—won’t be covered by your home insurance policy and will require specialized coverage.
  • Calculate how much it would cost to rebuild your home if it were completely destroyed. Include added costs for labor, materials and any new or updated building codes in your community that you would be required to comply with. Avoid making a rough estimate for this cost—be as specific as possible to ensure you know just how much coverage you need.
  • Analyze your personal risk and speak with a licensed insurance agent to review your options. Be sure to select a coverage option that fits within your budget, risk profile and comfort level.

 

We’re Here to Help

There are several factors to consider when determining which type of coverage is right for you, but you don’t have to navigate this decision alone. Acentria is here to walk you through your home insurance policy and provide expert guidance regarding which coverage option is best for you, your belongings and your wallet. For further coverage guidance, contact us today

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Ensuring Protection for Your Loved Ones – Even After You’re Gone

Life can be unpredictable. That’s why ensuring your loved ones are covered and protected after your death is important, especially we grow older. Family members who depend upon you for an income could be left in a challenging situation if you were to unexpectedly pass away.

Life insurance policies from Acentria Insurance are flexible, affordable and designed to fit both you and your family’s needs. As we somberly honor Widow’s Day, let’s take a deeper dive into the importance and intricacies of life insurance.

Are there different types of life insurance?

Acentria offers several types of life insurance policies suited for varying situations and needs. These policies are divided into two categories: term and permanent (or whole) life insurance

Whole Life Insurance: Otherwise known as straight life or permanent life, whole life insurance is the most traditional life insurance policy. Whole life is designed for customers who value absolute guarantees and consistency in rate of return, cost and benefits. These policies are more expensive than term policies in the early years, but they even out because of steady premiums.

 

Universal Life Insurance: Universal life insurance is a type of permanent life insurance that offers more flexibility in premiums and face value throughout the policy. Universal life insurance policies have the potential for higher earnings on the savings component, and there is usually a guaranteed return on the cash value. Disadvantages include possible higher fees and increasing premiums.

 

Variable Life Insurance: A variable life insurance policy is also a form of whole life insurance that typically has fixed premiums. With variable life insurance, you maintain control over the investment decisions for the cash value portion. However, this may be a riskier option because there is no guarantee for the cash value.

 

Term Life Insurance: Unlike the others, term life insurance is life insurance that protects you and your dependents for a specified period of time. It’s the simplest and cheapest form of life insurance, but there is no cash value. Once the period is up, your policy becomes invalid.

 

Employers often offer either term or whole coverage (or both). Some employers cover the full cost while others require employees to pay a premium.

What life events affect my life insurance policy?

If you have an existing life insurance policy, it’s important to keep your insurance agent up-to-date on any major changes that occur in your life. Your agent might suggest adding to your current life insurance policy (such as when you have children) or bundling that policy with another necessary policy (such as homeowners insurance for when you purchase a home).

These life changes include, but are not limited to:

  • Buying a home or renovating your current home
  • Having children or adopting children
  • Retiring (and moving residencies)
  • Getting married
  • Being responsible for a teenage driver
  • Buying or selling a business

Contact an Acentria agent to learn more about how these changes affect your current policies.

What factors impact life insurance premiums?

Many factors are considered when looking at life insurance premiums. Women typically pay less than men due to a longer life expectancy, while smokers pay higher premiums than non-smokers. An individual’s health, family history, occupational risk and lifestyle choices all impact your life insurance premiums.

All new life insurance policyholders are required to undergo a medical exam and answer questions about their medical history. It’s important to be honest during this process: lying about your medical history could result in a loss of policy or denied benefits for your dependents upon your death.

While some factors are beyond your control, there are ways to reduce your life insurance premiums through lifestyle changes. Quitting smoking, losing weight through diet and exercise, and improving your cholesterol all may help reduce your current premiums.

You may also have an opportunity to reduce your premiums through a group rate. Call your Acentria agent to learn more about our cost-saving group rates.

Protection Throughout Your Life and Beyond

At Acentria, we know the subject of life insurance can be overwhelming and possibly uncomfortable. We’re here to walk you through the process and answer any questions you have along the way. Our top priority is providing you with a policy that safeguards you and your family after you’re gone.

Request a life insurance quote here to learn how you can start protecting your loved ones today.

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Cyber Insurance; are you protected?

Cyber Attacks | Are You Prepared?

Unlike physical threats that prompt immediate action—like stopping, dropping and rolling if you catch on fire—cyber threats are often difficult to identify and understand. Cyber threats include dangers such as viruses erasing entire systems, intruders breaking into systems and altering files, intruders using your computer or device to attack others and intruders stealing confidential information. The spectrum of cyber risks is limitless; threats, some more serious and sophisticated than others, can have wide-ranging effects on the individual, community, organizational and national levels.

Before a Cyber Attack

You can increase your chances of avoiding cyber risks by setting up the proper controls. The following are things you can do to protect yourself, your family and your property before a cyber incident occurs:

  • Only connect to the internet over secure, password-protected networks.
  • Do not click on links or pop-ups, open attachments or respond to emails from strangers.
  • Always enter a URL by hand instead of following links if you are unsure of the sender.
  • Do not respond to online requests for personally identifiable information (PII). Most organizations—such as banks, universities and businesses—will never ask for your personal information over the internet.
  • Limit who you are sharing information with by reviewing the privacy settings on your social media accounts.
  • Trust your instincts. If you think an offer is too good to be true, it probably is.
  • Password-protect all devices that connect to the internet and all user accounts.
  • Do not use the same password twice—choose a password that means something to you and you only. Change your passwords on a regular basis (every 90 days or so).
  • If you see something suspicious, report it to the proper authorities.
  • The extent, nature and timing of cyber incidents are impossible to predict. There may or may not be any warning. Some cyber incidents take a long time (weeks, months or years) to be discovered and identified.


During a Cyber Attack

Here are some of the steps you should take during a cyberattack:

Immediate Actions

  • Check to make sure the software on all of your systems is up to date.
  • Run a scan to make sure your system is not infected or acting suspiciously.
  • If you find a problem, disconnect your device from the internet and perform a full system restore.

At Home

  • Disconnect your device (e.g., computers, gaming systems or tablets) from the internet. By removing the internet connection, you prevent an attacker or virus from being able to access your computer and perform tasks such as locating personal data, manipulating or deleting files, or using your device to attack others.
  • If you have anti-virus software installed on your computer, update the virus definitions, if possible, and perform a manual scan of your entire system. Install all of the appropriate patches to fix known vulnerabilities.

At Work

  • If you have access to an IT department, contact someone in it immediately. The sooner someone can investigate and clean your computer, the less damage to your computer and other computers on the network. If you believe you might have revealed sensitive information about your organization, report it to the appropriate people within the organization, including network administrators. They can be alert for any suspicious or unusual activity.
Public Locations
  • Immediately inform a manager or authority figure in charge. If someone has access to an IT department, contact the department immediately.

After a Cyber Attack

In addition to insuring your home, Acentria is committed to helping you and your loved ones stay safe when disaster strikes. If you would like more information on how to protect yourself from a cyber-attack, please contact us at 863.374.5084 or www.acentria.com today.


More About PII

PII is information that can be used to uniquely identify, contact or locate a single person. PII includes but is not limited to:

  • Full name
  • Social security number
  • Address
  • Date of birth
  • Place of birth
  • Driver’s license number
  • Vehicle registration plate number
  • Credit card numbers
  • Physical appearance
  • Gender or race

Take these steps if you believe your PII has been compromised:

  • Immediately change all passwords, and change your financial passwords first. If you used the same password for multiple resources, make sure to change it for each account, and do not use that password in the future.
  • If you believe the compromise was caused by malicious code, disconnect your computer from the internet.
  • Restart your computer in safe mode and perform a full system restore.
  • Contact businesses, including banks, where you have accounts, as well as credit reporting companies.
  • Close any accounts that may have been compromised. Watch for any unexplainable or unauthorized charges to your accounts.

For more in-depth tips on how to protect yourself, your family, and your property before a cyberattack occurs, visit the cybersecurity resources found on Ready.gov.

Are you a business owner interested in speaking with a team member to review Cyber Insurance for your business? We're here to help; contact us to learn more! 

 *Tips and information provided by Zywave, Inc. 
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